Indian Springs Baptist Church
Sunday, July 22, 2018
A Pioneer Ministry since 1829

CHURCH HISTORY

 
Please check back regularly for ongoing historical notes and stories. New items will be posted at the bottom of the page. Thank you for your interest in our history, We thank GOD for His continued blessings upon ALL who have been part of this special place in Florida history.
 
 
 
 
 
     The present church building was constructed in 1854, however, Indian Springs Baptist Church began much earlier on July 18, 1829 about three miles closer to Lake Miccosukee.  It has remained in continual existence for 189 years and is today the oldest surviving Baptist Church in Leon County and is the 5th oldest Baptist Church in the State of Florida.

     At the present time we have several 4th and 5th generation families attending
Indian Springs and we pray this community of God's love will continue through our children, their children and for many generations to come.  Our desire is to minister to you and your loved ones and to help strengthen your faith in Jesus Christ. We pray this site is informative and inspirational and we look forward to  hearing from you.
     There were eleven people who qualified to become "charter members" of what they would modestly call "The Church of Jesus Christ at Indian Springs".  Now that they decided on a name,they determined where to build their church house.  It was to be on a rise of ground surrounded by thick undergrowth and tall live oaks draped by Spanish moss.  They would call their church Indian Springs because of its proximity to the Spring head of Panther Creek, a favorite camping spot for Indian hunting parties a few years earlier, but now the site of a Christian meeting house.
 
 
**The first meeting house of the Indian Springs Baptist Church was made of logs, sawn and put together without nails in the typical fashion of pioneer Florida houses.  Inside the building the men built crude slab benches with no backs on them.  They built a stand for a pulpit and a table from which to serve the Lord's Supper.  Unglazed windows protected the dim inner sanctum with sturdy shutters.
 
     Pastors of Early Indian Springs Baptist Church were:
1829 - 1834     Theophilus Hardie
1834 - 1838     John B. Lacy
1839                Lacy; John B. Broome
1939 - 1842     John B. Broome
1843                Jesse Goodman
1844 - 1853     Buckley S. Fuller
1854 - 1857     Wiley Blewett
1858 - 1863     William B. Cooper
1864 - 1865     Columbus Smith
1866                Unknown
1867 - 1868     Wiley Blewett
1869 - 1871     Chas. D. Campbell
1872 - 1876     (Not Listed)
1877                J.R. Kimbrew
1878                Stephen S. Proctor
1879 - 1888     Andrew M. Manning
1889                William M. Reynolds
1890                Reynolds; Manning
1891 - 1905     Andrew M. Manning
1906                Manning; Crockett
1907                Stephen C. Crockett 
 
The Indian Springs Baptist Church adopted as its Articles of Faith, the Philadelphia Confession of Faith (1742), which was standard among Baptists and was the official Abstract of Principles of the Ocklockonee Association.  There were twelve articles:
1.     We believe in the one only true and living GOD, and that there are three persons in the Godhead, the Father, the Son, and Holy Ghost.
2.     We believe the Scripture of the Old and New Testaments are the Word of GOD, and the only rule of faith and practice.
3.     We believe in the doctrine of eternal and particular election.
4.     We believe in the doctrine of original sin.
5.     We believe in man's impotency to recover himself from the state he is in, by nature, by his own free will and ability.
6.     We believe that sinners are justified in the sight of GOD only by the imparted righteousness of Christ.
7.     We believe that GOD's Elect shall be called, regenerated and sanctified by the Holy Ghost.
8.     We believe that the saints shall persevere in grace and never finally fall away.
9.     We believe that baptism and the Lord's Supper are ordinances of Jesus Christ and true believers are the only subjects of those ordinances, and we believe the only true mode of baptism is immersion.
10.     We believe that the punishment of the wicked will be everlasting, and joys of the righteous will be eternal.
11.    We believe that no minister has a right to the administration of the  ordinances, only such as are regularly called and come under the imposition of the hands of the presbytery.
12.     We believe in the resurrection of the dead and a general judgement.
 
The articles listed above recognize but two church ordinations: 
(1) Believer's baptism by immersion and (2)  Lord's Supper exclusively for baptized believers.  YET, because of the controversy taking place at that time in many southern churches, the Indian Springs church adopted the practice of foot washing as a custom for many years, though not recognized as a church ordinance.
Foot washing was generally conducted at stated intervals-sometimes at each meeting, sometimes once a quarter--as a symbol of humility.  After the regular preaching service, basins of water were brought forward and the members washed each others feet and dried them with towels--women on one side of the house and men on the other.  The custom would be continued by Primitive, or Hardshell (anti-missinary) Baptists, but would be discontinued by missionary Baptists after the schism of 1842.
A pioneer church had been organized; it was learning fundamental lessons about the life and faith.  But the history of Florida was about to be enacted among its members, and some of them were going to have a significant part.
 
 
(All accounts are excerpts from "INDIAN SPRINGS" The Story of a Pioneer Church in Leon County, Florida). a book researched and written by Dr. James C. Bryant The Florida State University. 1971
 
 
 
 
 
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